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Grins, Giggles, and Gifts

A shopping experiencetoinspire, to motivate, and to make your day a little brighter☀️

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Gratitude Box

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Port Aransas Collection

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Each box is and filled with the positive energy, the love, and the giggles you get when visiting our store in Port Aransas.

Perfect for you, butalso an amazing gift🎁

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We ❤️ What We Do

We found this wonderful little shop, to be unique, and fun and full of love and laughs. The Owner, Sally was just as wonderful and unique. Found an instant friend within the walls of this wonderful little store.

This is the best place to find that perfect gift for the hardest to shop for.... And always something for yourself!

This is such a fun store and the fun starts in the parking lot with the bubble machine going! The owner is such an awesome and kind soul! Love this place!

Wonderfully Fun shop! My husband and I had such a great time shopping and looking at everything in here and laughing and talking with the owner. Such positive energy as soon as you step on the glitter-filled porch!

Best funky place on town!! Great little shop packed with the neatest things you gotta have to take back home with you!

Sally and her store are a breath of fresh air. If you don't come out of there with a smile on your face, something isn't right with you.

Most positive place here on the island. If you want to be uplifted by just the attitude of a person. Go see the pink haired lady.

I had the best time at Gratitude!!!! The owner let us put on wigs and take pics!!!! Best place we shopped on the island

Sally is a true Port Aransas gift! Her shop and her personality make this town glitter and shine. Thank you Sally...we love your shop and your big heart!!!

"I started Gratitude to create an atmosphere of positivity where people can feel better, laugh a little, and smile more.

Our products strive toinspire, motivate, and help people remember how truly blessed we all are."

-Sally |Thankful Owner of Gratitude

316 N. Station Street

Port Aransas, TX 78373

Tues- Sat, 10am - 4pmSun - Mon, Out Loving Life

361.749.0302

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Do you meditate? Do you want to?

In Camp Calm the idea is to develop a modest but consistent meditation practice, and a few mindful living habits, at a gentle pace of about ten minutes a day. No experience necessary, and it can fit virtually any schedule.

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Camp Calm is back for a Seventh Season.

More than a thousand people have learned to meditate through Camp Calm. Come learn some mindfulness skills, and take a load off your mind.

It’s easy and straightforward and we do it all with a fun Summer camp theme. I’m pretty proud of it, and I hope you’ll consider joining us.

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This was lovely. I have given the same advice, which of course made reading this particularly delightful. It’s a rare pleasure to be poetically validated. Once I was chirping away about what I call “active gratitude” as oppose to “passive gratitude” and my friend said that her gratitude journal saved her life. Ah, humble moments. I think the one does not substitute the other but that they serve different purposes. The writing exercises can be grounding, clarifying and generative of positive feelings especially when one is feeling down. While in the moment appreciation can be a way to be more fully present with coffee and other miracles.

Yes. And there are so many objects of gratitude that are almost impossible to describe. Just a feeling of abundance at the end of the day, a certain mood, the way a certain color makes you feel. It’s limitless, unlike the number of gratitude objects we can list when we sit down to think about it.

Beautifully put, David. Just the reminder I needed. Thank you.

Thank you David,

It is quite uncanny how often, as I become aware of certain lessons life is teaching me, you confirm them by your writings.

In Cape Town, we are currently experiencing a devastating drought, with the real risk of taps running dry by May this year. This would result in 3 million people having to que for 25 liters of water every day. Right now we are capped at 50 liters per person per day.

This might sound like a very negative experience, but it has resulted in a complete mind switch in our home.

We have come to the realisation that we have been taking so many things for granted. Our relationship with water has become one of constant gratitude. Every drop is recycled, re-used and carefully measured. Our mindset has changed from fear of the unknown to gratitutude of having water in the taps today. We celebrate the weather, regardless of whether it is blistering hot or blisfully overcast. On sunny days, we soak up the sun, drink some wine and enjoy the company of friends around a fire. On days where the is a possiblility of rain, we carry out buckets, connect flow tanks to our gutters and dance in the rain when it arrives. We have become aware of the needs of our neighbours, as not everybody has the bodily strenght or means to collect and carry 25 liters of water from the collection points. We notice our abundance in all aspects of our lives, a full tank of fuel, fruit in the bowl, the sound of the kids laughing as they bathe in a bucket. Life has become an adventure, and a grateful one at it. We could have succumbed to fear and doubt if we chose to. We decided that it takes up too much energy. No amount of fear is going to change the reality of what is right now. A sense of adventure and gratitude, however, keeps us in the moment and allows us to stay focused on what is really real. This moment. This lesson. This growth experience that nothing can ever take away from us.

Thanks for this anecdote. One time we do really notice the value of our real-time conditions is when they change. When something value appears or leaves, we can more easily see its value. But everything that’s always there is easy to overlook.

Two years ago my city had a very minor E.Coli scare in our water supply, for about 24 hours. By afternoon store shelves were emptied of bottled water. It doesn’t take very much of an upset to the status quo to put our blessings in perspective.

“The pleasure of these sights is already mine; I don’t need to convince myself that they constitute a good reason to be grateful, and certainly no one else needs to understand.”

One of many great statements in this excellent post, David.

It’s all too easy to live the majority of our waking hours in the meandering tunnels and elaborate structures of our own thoughts, sucking up our attention and blinding us to the multidimensionally creative moment continuously presenting itself to us – as you describe so beautifully.

Our thoughts are so much less interesting than the actual experiences we think about. And of course they are — we can’t even come close to getting our words and concepts around the richness of experiences. Try describing a sunset for example, or a scent, or the feeling of being in a room with a particular person. We can’t even scratch the surface of it with thoughts and words, but we can very easily experience it.

Gratitude is the first step to happiness and yes, it should be a feeling of gratefulness rather than a thought. It has such a liberating quality!

However, you may have a memory of something that has made you feel happy in the past and that you may want to replicate, such as swimming in the sea. The feel-good thought would remind you how good it feels when you immerse yourself in the ocean. Now, you are grateful that you live on the coast and that you can swim in the sea. From thought to reality.

In addition to asking yourself, “What am I grateful for in my life, right now?”, Tara Brach suggests that you also ask yourself the following question: “Please tell me, what do you love?”.

I find the latter very helpful because it may be difficult to know what we are grateful for but it is easier to know what we love, what gives us pleasure.

The happy memory is a trigger for something that you have experienced and if you can bring the experience back into your reality, that is something else to be grateful about.

I totally agree that gratitude can only be experienced in the “now”, this moment which is the only reality in your life. The past is just a thought and your future may or may not happen the way that you imagine.

Thank you for the great post.

There’s certainly nothing wrong with fond memories. But they are limited in their ability to generate gratitude compared to noticing blessings in real time. But when you’re far from the ocean your options are limited if you’re looking for a particular feeling.

It seems like a weird coincidence to see this email today. I have been deeply frustrated lately by my own inability to rationalize happiness and the disappointment it brings others. I think what bothers me is that it requires this huge leap – from one’s dark corner to a vista of grand perspective. And this article explains how to build the bridge – how to at least shape the first step, and bricolage from there. Just before I read this, I was sort of replaying the song Future Starts Slow by The Kills in my head and I had a fuzzy sense that it held a gem of advice for me, but the thought floated away as I weighed the options of opening this email vs. continuing to work. I think it’s like that… feeling better is a process, and no one ever tells you how to start. Thank you.

I don’t know if it takes a grand leap in perspective. I think feeling better is a matter of gradually learning better and better ways to relate to your experience in life, and all of that happens now. We talk about the present moment as though it’s a sliver of our lives, but it’s the whole thing. Nothing happens that isn’t in the present moment, even our memories and expectations. In my experience perspective comes in bits and pieces and it can take a while to internalize any given insight.

To me, practicing gratitude exercises (listing 5 things blah blah blah) was always frustrating – rather than feeling grateful I felt frustrated that despite having all the things to be happy, I was still miserable. That was depressing. Your method seems to be what I need. Thanks David.

I was just going to write the same – this “think of 5 things to be grateful for” felt so “fake” all the time. Yes, it made me acknowledge the fact that I am/we are living a very privileged life, but it felt so forced and contrary to my intention of generating the sensation of gratitude inside. I’ve always been “the weird one” in our family, the one who notices the wonderful shade of the sky or the funny shape of the clouds, or ask other people around whether they are also enjoying the delightful bird-songs (which they haven’t even noticed at that point) – I’ve been the butt of good-natured jokes since I was kid, but I never did mind: I enjoyed noticing these things. And that usually leads to “genuine”, organic gratitude. Thank you for the wonderful article!

Thank you for the reminder. I kept my daily meditation up for a solid month after Camp Calm ended and I didn’t realize it until now, but the mindfulness and gratitude of what’s in my present moment went with it. I’m looking forward to re-starting both. The nice thing about the present-moment awareness is that I can start again right here and now (which is the whole point), from the warmth of this cozy bed while the winds whip down off the mountains outside my door. Thank you.

It’s interesting how this happens. Mindfulness builds up gradually as we practice, and it stays with us for a while even after you slip away from it. But at a certain point you realize “Wow, I have certainly lost something since I stopped meditating.” Peace and gratitude don’t announce their exit, they just kind of slip away quietly. I wrote a called “When peace goes away it doesn’t make a sound” to describe that phenomenon.

I awoke feeling pretty well rested. Grateful to see your beautiful art in my inbox. Many thanks David !

David, This. My god you’ve put my thoughts into the most eloquently worded post. Something I just could not do. I almost feel like crying from relief. Thank you, thank you. Cheers

David, this is one of your all-time greats. Beautifully put.

Thanks for this, David. You have such a way with words. I could never imagine describing those small moments of peace, appreciation and joy as well as you did in this post.

And also, thank you for a tangible reminder why I should keep sticking with my daily meditation habit :) “Small” benefits like those mentioned in the article are so beautiful, and can only be experienced, like you said.

Right, and meditation allows this to happen automatically, because you’re conditioning yourself to keep returning to present moment experience. As far as I’m concerned, it’s the only way to do it consistently. Otherwise we so easily get swept away by the mental narrative from moment to moment, and only notice our experience openly when something right there and then reminds us, and that doesn’t happen often enough to create a habit.

Epiphany! As I read this article, I experienced one of those shifts in perspective and experience, similar to a tumbler sliding when a key is turning in a lock. As I’ve practiced daily gratitude writings, there has always been a hollowness or unease…almost a sense of hypocrisy. This aspect of mindful attentiveness in gratitude you have written of just shifted my universe. Thank you.

I actually think there’s some value to practicing gratitude in an “analytic” way. When I started writing in my gratitute journal I was kind of feeling down in the dumps, so I needed that momentum to turn my life around and prime my brain to look for things in my life that actually make it worth living (I was not suicidal or anything, I was just going through a difficult moment). I wrote in my journal every day for about a year until I started noticing something: more and more often I’d feel appreciative of something/someone around me in the present moment and it felt really good. Now I only write in my journal once a week, just to keep the momentum going, but I do agree with you that I tend to be more present and, as a result of it, more appreciative of what’s happening around me right here, right now.

There’s certainly room for logical assessments of our position in life, and in fact I don’t think we can avoid doing that, such as when we’re doing some life planning or strategizing. But as you said yourself, one of the great benefits of listing reasons to be grateful is that it makes you more likely to notice objects of gratitude in your experience as they happen. We can cultivate that habit directly, whether or not there are additional benefits from doing it analytically.

I found the daily gratitude journal exercise to be the first step in living a more grateful life. After a while when I became aware of a great moment during the day I would think, “I’ll be writing this down!”. I no longer keep the journal, but think the initial exercise was instrumental in my living more in the present. Now I just say a thank you to the universe and take a moment to feel the gratitude.

Yes, Pietro. I agree the author missed the point of gratitude journals. Recording what we’re grateful for helps us to see more instances in each day (changes our brain and the lens through which we see the world), eliciting more of the experiential gratitude that author advocates. Having a written record also helps when a person cannot seem to drum up positive thoughts — just leaf through the journal to remember all the wonderful moments. Finally, the 2 can go hand in hand: feel gratitude throughout the day, all the special moments, and then savor them each night by writing them down.

I kept a 5 Things gratitude journal for a while, but it became repetitive. I was always grateful for the same things, every day! I didn’t need to remind myself.

Good post.

Kate

This is so on point, and such a joy for me to read. I try to do this every day and try to explain to others how doing it makes me content and at peace with myself and the world… it’s difficult. But thanks for the post, which for me was in itself the thing is spoke about – I experienced a conscious few minutes of gratitude, possibly most of all for being able to feel gratitude :)

Explaining isn’t always possible. I have struggled for years to communicate that I absolutely love the sensation of noticing the change in the feel of the air as I pass through a door, and I have no idea if anyone ever got it. But it is so clear to me whenever I do it, and maybe I’ll never get anyone else to appreciate it :)

lovely writtings, sitting here so happy and blessed. (not my usual state of being). thank you

Thank you for this, David. Perfect for first thing this morning. A few weeks ago I was washing out a bottle (big deal, right?) but the soap suds made bubbles inside and some were pointy and beautiful shapes – it was an intricate universe right there. I had to tell a neighbour about it and show her, it was so exciting. It’s right on….the list of five things never worked and felt contrived. Also got to say you have some pretty great folks who are responding to your posts here….what they say makes a difference to me as well.

I looked up after reading this and spied my cat – asleep on the couch. He rose, stretched grandly, and then lazily curled back into a ball for the rest of his nap. It was glorious to watch and I probably would have missed it if I hadn’t just read this. Thank you.

Dear David,

I loved this post, as usual!

The gratitude journal has been used for a couple of years within our family and it’s been transformative. Really! my kids started expressing gratitude for things I do, which they never did before.

Recently though, just like you, I came to the realization that we need something to help us feel grateful more in the moment to moment, so the gratitude is not relegated to be just another bed time ritual. I came up with a technique, which I illustrated with cartoons here, in case you wanna take a look:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BeRcUTbjzmp/?taken-by=anicastillo

I love when I see you’re thinking about things I was thinking about as well. For some reason I feel validated!

Thank you and all my best David,

Ani

Beautiful. I so often struggle with the “abstract” gratitude when things feel hard. Then I beat myself up because I “ought” to be grateful for all the blessings in my life, even if, at this moment I feel lonely or sad or whatever. Much more helpful to stay in the present moment and notice, say, the glorious daffodils in the vase in front of me. Thankyou.

Thank you David so much for articulating this beautifully. Settling my mind (enough to notice the moments in front of me) is the source of my every waking moment these days along with switching out of my mind into more of a feeling type of awareness. It’s beyond humbling to accept that I’m miserable at it despite years of walking this path.

This is really an interesting way to look at it. The other way, i.e. essentially forcing myself to feel gratitude, makes me feel guilty that I didn’t feel it already.

I haven’t had a lot of success writing a gratitude journal. It can help in the moment, but the effect is not as pronounced, as say when something real is felt. Loving attention on the moment is an irreplaceable practice. A lot of rephrasing that we all promote by sharing our little insights, are more real when they come from within. My ego is what it is. Fighting it, by attempting to rephrase can only work so much. But holding it with loving attention, and allowing moments to pass through, reality shows and rephrasing is spontaneous (often in ways I hadn’t predicted).

Ah, so that explains it!…I do that, but hadn’t put it together with the explanation. I am alone a lot and friends wonder why I am not lonely or depressed. Sure, I get down a bit sometimes, but I see that bit of sun through the trees and how it shines in my window or how the energy is so softly peaceful and quiet as my dog snores, I watch how the fire in the stove burns, and how the lights turn on when I simply flip a switch. I live this and I am fullfilled. face palm moment. thanks!

Aw, David — how lovely, how true! Spiritual practice as instead just living naturally, the way we yearn to. Taking a single step in that direction, coming closer to the way we know we are. You speak it so well, inspiring that attainable one step at a time. Thank you, thank you!

hmmmm, if I didnt know better…. I might think you are simply trying to trick us into…..being …. happy ??? lol… LOVE this post and am living it!

I’ve done the gratitude exercise you describe, writing down thoughts and found it actually decreased my well-being and state of mind.

But once I was far less prescriptive and free, I became more naturally grateful. I went for a long run on Sunday, and found so many things that sparked joy….crocuses coming up, the water against the rocks, birds wading in the sand, and I was grateful that I am able bodied and could actually run.

Love it, so true, thanks for the beautiful reminder that made me notice the warm sunlight that enters my window at this exact moment.

David, this was so life-affirming for me to read this today! I am not someone who is comfortable writing things down in a Gratitude Journal. It always felt fake and forced to me and after a short while, I have difficulty thinking of things to write down. I DO though very often notice little things like others have described, the play of light and shadow as the sun hits the curtains in late afternoon, the peacefulness of my sleeping cat, the warmth of the covers when having a lie-in bed to read a book…. but I always thought this was not enough! I am glad to see that you and others are like-minded and it gives me permission to enjoy my life like this without the pressure of feeling I am not grateful enough. I do keep a daily journal and am thinking of adding something to it called “What I Learned Today” (WILT) to just jot down new things that I learned that day – it might be fun to look back and see what I made note of.

Love this article, David and somehow perfectly timed as I’ve been realizing the exact same sentiment these days. I even wrote a post about it here in my personal journal that I started recently. http://embersofjoy.com/2018/02/03/full-of-gratitude/#more-326

Simple things like the sun on my face and hot water magically appearing with the turn of a faucet makes me feel so immensely grateful these days. I find along with this feeling of noticing life and being thankful brings along more empathy for others than I ever felt before too. Do you notice that? It’s both beautiful and heartbreaking sometimes.

I related to every word in this post, often reading some sentences twice over because this article in itself was one of those exact moments. Thank you David.

I do this daily as well. I call it looking for small signs of beauty. After doing the gratitude journal, I, too, find this form of daily meditation on small beauty and small daily things to be thankful for much more life changing.

This post resonates with me 100%, i always felt so but could never decipher so beautifully! The magic truly lies in the small details. Spot On Heeled Court / Overlay Vamp Natural Ivory i02EdrtI

For many years, I have been writing 3 things that have happened in the last 24 hours, that I am grateful for. Though I do find that I am repeating myself, I also realise that there are so many nice things that are happening to me/around me. When I am writing this, I feel grateful to my family members, friends, external circumstances, etc. on a regular basis and, it really makes me feel nice.

Hey David!! I’m pretty late to mention about your post- “If It’s Important, Learn It Repeatedly”, it was great!! And, off course this one is also good. Actually, Gratitude from heart or mind, have a pure beauty. We should exercise this behavior more more to make our mind broader…..

This may be your best post ever! Hyperbolically speaking.

You are so right David “The experience not the idea” When I read that I could only thought about how grateful you feel to find a bathroom (or get home to yours) when you need one badly….sorry that’s not as romantic or poetic as other comments but it’s so tangible to women, especially the ones who had been pregnant at some point of their lives.

This reminded me a little of how small children see the world. They may not be feeling the gratitude we feel as they are not yet old enough to understand the concept perhaps, but the wonder and awe they get from the every day minutia…is that something that gets lost as we grow into adults? We have to work to keep it. It’s like “play” – not many adults have “play” in their lives anymore…

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I'm David, and Raptitude is a street-level look at the human experience. I write about what school never taught us: how to improve your quality of life in real-time.
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The word enthusiasm is derived from the Greek word, , which means to be . Enthusiasm is an incredibly powerful tool to create momentum. Enthusiasm can also be used to combat fear and nervousness and it can even create temporary energy and willpower. Being enthusiastic also creates an overall feeling of happiness and well-being that makes it worthwhile regardless of its positive side-effects.

So many of us are unenthusiastic. The media is constantly barraging us with messages of tragedy, pessimism and fear. The people we are around tend to side more on the end of cynicism and sarcasm rather than enthusiasm. As a result this behavior becomes our own. With a generally apathetic and pessimistic society, we naturally adapt these kind of behaviors, largely without realizing we are doing it. With such an environment, how can we possibly hope to cultivate the kind of enthusiasm we need?

Enthusiasm is like any other skill. If it is continually practiced and exercised, it gets better. If it is not, then it will degrade. Enthusiasm rarely comes naturally and it must be the result of conscious effort. Practicing the ability to use enthusiasm can keep you excited and driven even in horrible circumstances. Without this ability even great circumstances are viewed through the lens of sarcasm and cynicism. So how can we harness our own?

Passion

Genuine enthusiasm can only be sustained about something you are truly passionate about. Anyone can get themselves hyped up over a boring situation for the moment, but sustained enthusiasm can only come when you deeply care about something. If you aren’t that interested in the outcome of something, you won’t be able to create enthusiasm.

Don’t spend your time pursuing things that you aren’t passionate about. If you aren’t passionate about something, try to minimize or remove the time it is taking from your life. Nobody is going to applaud you for working at a boring job, having boring hobbies or staying in a dead relationship when you are dead. We are ultimately responsible for the amount of passion we experience in our lives.

If you look at really successful people, all of them having something they are very passionate about. These people have a drive that compels them to give 110%. Nothing is more motivating than an obsessive passion. As a self-proclaimed obsessive about personal growth, I can attest to that.

Passion provides the fuel, without it and their can be no fire of enthusiasm.

Energy

Being enthusiastic requires a lot more energy. If you feeling like passing out from exhaustion at the end of the day, chances are you aren’t brimming with excitement. Enthusiasm and energy are very closely linked. Being energetic makes it far more likely for you to be enthusiastic and enthusiasm can literally create the energy you need to get going. This may sound like a catch-22, but it isn’t.

Energy comes mostly from a healthy lifestyle. Exercise, eat right and get plenty of rest and water is the first step. Many people like to debate minutia about whether or not to eat xyz or whether they should be taking a vitamin zyx supplement. These little differences are only going to make the difference if you’ve already mastered the basics of a healthy lifestyle.

Physiology

Temporary enthusiasm can actually be created relatively easily simply by acting more enthusiastic. Simply by acting more enthusiastic then you feel, you can literally create the same level of enthusiasm inside. I use this technique whenever I am in a social situation where I need some added confidence or energy.

Think about how you act when you are enthusiastic. Smiling, moving around more and having more expressive body language are likely key characteristics. By making the conscious effort to behave more enthusiastically, you will start to feel more enthusiastic. After a few minutes you will probably create the kind of enthusiasm that your body language suggests.

Our body language commands a lot more of our internal behaviors then we think. Most of us believe that it is our internal emotions that create our body language. The situation, however, actually works in reverse as well. Body language itself can create the emotions it represents. I wrote about this more .

Now that you have some ideas on how you can create enthusiasm, both temporary and long-term, what are some possible uses for this new skill?

Countering Fear and Nervousness

What do most people do to try to get rid of nervousness. They try to calm themselves down. Maybe take a few deep breaths or a drink of water. Unfortunately, this is probably one of the worst ways to counter it. Trying to calm yourself down only strengthens the nervousness until you are completely paralyzed.

Using enthusiasm takes the opposite approach. Acting incredibly enthusiastic will start by masking any nervousness in your body language and speaking. Once you’ve started to create that enthusiasm within yourself, fear and nervousness will be blocked out of your mind. The next time you are in a situation where you think you might be nervous, try to counter with enthusiasm.

Building Motivation and Momentum

Quick question:

Action of course! As soon as you start taking action, thoughts of procrastinating are blown away. Unfortunately this is a catch-22. You can’t act because of the procrastination and you need the action to get rid of the procrastination! At this point we can usually adopt numerous behaviors and techniques to try and convince us to do just enough action to break the threshold.

How about another approach. Enthusiasm. Enthusiastic people don’t procrastinate what they are enthusiastic about. If at all possible, create some enthusiasm in yourself. You can use the physiology technique to create some quick enthusiasm. By leveraging this small amount of enthusiasm you can create the momentum you need to stop procrastinating.

This can also apply on a long-term basis as well. Although the physiology technique generally only works in short periods, utilizing passion and energy can help us create long-term momentum. By investing our time in our passions and taking steps to improve our energy we can create the kind of enthusiasm that will be with us when we need it for a longer period of time.

Improving Communication

Enthusiasm is a great communication tool. Enthusiasm grants you licence to a lot more confidence than you might otherwise have without appearing arrogant or boastful. By leveraging enthusiasm it is far easier to communicate with others and the quality of that communication is greatly improved.

If you’ve ever found yourself in a situation where you wanted to be more outgoing and extroverted, enthusiasm can be one of the best tools at your disposal. Enthusiasm centers your focus outside of your own ego which separates you from your need to protect it. When you don’t need to protect your ego, you can enter any communication situation without fear or worry.

The benefits of enthusiasm are vast. From improving productivity, social skills, and confidence to reducing fears and nervousness, enthusiasm is an incredibly powerful tool. Remember that long-term enthusiasm is a skill that needs to be developed. Focusing on your passions and working on your own personal energy will give you the base you need for enthusiasm. Like a spark, guiding your physiology can create a fiery enthusiasm for anything you do. Utilize that enthusiasm and you can get the most out of your life!

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Starting at $1,500

Collisions often result in a bent frame, decreasing the car's structural integrity. We use computer aided machines to pull frames straight, restore factory specifications, replace panels, repair dents and computer match paint.

Your convenience is our top priority. Our online scheduling gives you a jump start on getting damage estimates and scheduling your auto body repairs.

Our service goal is to keep you in the driver’s seat. That’s why we are diligent about updating you on the status of your vehicle's repairs.

We care about our work. So, as long as you own your vehicle, we’ll fix any faulty repair work. Schaefer will Make it Like it Never Happened™

Schaefer Autobody's "Never Happened" Promise

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(Tesla Model X Repair)…thank you, my husband and I couldn’t be happier. We both really had a terrific experience and were so appreciative that you worked us in. The work and service were great, thank you.

Keen Womens Terradora WP Hiking Shoe Bungee Cord/Malachite 6 M US dIe1EETsM

I took my car into Schaefer Auto Body for some minor cosmetic repairs. The contact I had with Brett Billington and Jennifer Taylor was nothing short of excellent, not to mention the repairs to my car. It looks absolutely fantastic, and shows no signs that the car was ever even scratched. I’m a female and pride myself on keeping my car in tip-top shape. If in the future I have collision repair needs, I’ll be taking my car back to Schaefer! They do fantastic work!

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717.361.1000 | One Alpha Drive | Elizabethtown, PA 17022-2298 | Copyright 2018 Elizabethtown College

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